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Your Holiday Itinerary for Looe

Away from the daily mumblings of the English city life, Looe is the perfect coastal refuge when in Cornwall. This 5000-strong town is more than a dainty village; it is filled with historic churches and harbour sights you can calmly enjoy. Here’s a holiday guide for your next Looe trip.

Pick your Cottage

Exploring this small fishing village can get rather tiring. Your first agenda, therefore, is to get settled in your cottage. Looe offers a selection of delightful cottages around the harbour, from a nice rustic dwelling with the romantic fireplace to the modern holiday house facing the sea.

Dropping names is possible as every self-catering cottage is equally beautiful. A wise move would be to check out accommodation sites (e.g., Airbnb, Trip Advisor, or Visit Cornwall) and compare rates and reviews.

If you wish, you can also camp in the nearby areas of Fowey, Polperro, Rame, and Plymouth. Driving through the coastal towns of South Cornwall is truly a refreshing experience.

East Looe Beach

You probably have arrived at Looe mid-day. Take a quiet stroll for a little while and explore the sunset hues at East Looe Beach, a short walk away from the town. It’d be fantastic if your booked accommodation is just within reach, too. It’d be easier to enjoy raw experiences like crabbing and seashell counting.

A little farther is the Banjo pier, where you and your family can watch the fishing boats dock as the day wraps up. Truly an authentic harbour holiday.

Guildhall Museum and Gaol

Start your next day with a historic exploration of the town’s former hall and magistrate’s court. The Guildhall Museum and Gaol, built in the 16th century, houses remnants of the past — shipbuilding materials, minerals collection, prison cells, and magistrate’s benches.

The Old Sardine Factory

Grab a quick lunch at the Old Sardine Factory, now converted to a cafe and restaurant, Looe’s newest attraction in the west side. This Victorian building was recently rehabilitated to become the town’s heritage site, equipped with a massive coastline exhibition and a virtual reality booth featuring the smuggling and fishing life of the past. To get your body warmed up for adventures, try the center’s wall climbing, too.

Talland Bay

Now, it’s time for real outdoor adventures. Jumping from the sardine factory, head to the picturesque Talland Bay, also in the west. The view of the twin coves is so captivating you can’t stop snapping photos. In Talland, you’ll also see the intriguing 18th-century church filled with vicar stories.

Yet if you crave for more adrenaline-pumping activities, you can hire equipment and gear for kayaking, canoeing, or paddling at the Talland cafe (or at the Black Beach Hire) before heading on to the south. Don’t be shy to ask for guides around the cafe, people will more likely have ready names and numbers.

Looe Island

Discover the beauty of Looe Island via a boat. Under the management of the Cornwall Wildlife Trust, you can safely cross the 22.2-acre vastness of the water with a guide. You’ll also see a Medieval Lamanna Chapel built in the 500s as part of a Celtic monastery. There, you will witness the religious significance of the island, believed to be where Joseph brought the child Jesus.

Looe may be geographically small but filled with awesome and rewarding experiences. The Adrenaline Quarry offers rope adventures. Free falling is best experienced with friends. Try the Giant Swing. The Monkey Sanctuary tour is educational just as it is absorbing. You can get there by taking the Millendreath Beach.

Indeed, there’s so much to discover in Looe. Take time to organize which routes will be most suitable for your wanderlust needs.

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